Video Banners are Here (For Some)

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***7.20.17: UPDATE: Video banners are now cropping very awkwardly to the upper left-hand corner of the videos instead of staying centered like the preview. Hopefully this will be fixed shortly.***

You may have noticed that some business pages now have videos (!) as their banner instead of a still photo. I will warn you, this feature is still in beta and the uploading is touch and go. The banner dimensions are also awkward for a full frame video, however, you can still position the video like you would a photo, cropping it to the best dimensions after upload. And making a simple slideshow with stock photos is a great way to start if you don’t have the funds for something produced professionally.

Personally, I think it makes the page more dynamic and appealing to potential customers. Videos, even slideshows with simple music, can evoke much more feeling from viewers, and therefore a stronger connection with your brand, product, and services.

If you don’t yet have this feature available to you, just sit tight, they are still working out the bugs and slowly rolling it out to select pages at this point.

Custom Audiences

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Understanding how to make the best use of Facebook Custom Audiences can be frustrating for sure. I’ve already talked about creating lookalike audiences from web traffic in the previous blog post. Another great way to target a custom audience is by uploading a CSV of your current customers. Some well established businesses are just starting to use Facebook now, and need to connect with their already large and loyal fan base. Taking their existing customer database, we can create a custom audience and then boost page posts to that audience, or run a page-like campaign to that audience.

As with the web-visitors, I would also create a lookalike audience based on the customer list. Then, in ads manager, you can create a conglomeration of all these audiences and target them at the same time, or create different ad sets to see which audiences perform the best. So you are essentially targeting people who share common characteristics with the customers to whom you’ve already sold something, rather than random people who use FB. It just makes sense.

Creating Lookalike Audiences on Facebook

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Is your business looking to attract new customers? A great way to target potential customers on Facebook is by creating Lookalike Audiences.

The first thing is to create a Custom Audience for web visitors, using the Facebook Pixel. I set this up to capture “Anyone who visits your website” in the past 180 days. Once this audience is set up (if you haven’t already) it can take some time to accumulate users here.

Now if your web traffic is pretty steady you should accumulate a good size audience with these parameters, and then Facebook will be able to create a Lookalike audience based on these visitors. Even if you are only getting a few thousand people in your web visitor audience, your lookalike audience could be up to 2 million people.

You can also create a Lookalike Audience based on fans you already have on your page. That way, you know you will be targeting a demographic likely to be interested in your brand, products and services.

There are many more advance targeting actions we could take, but I won’t explain them all here. Just look at this screen grab to get an idea.

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The possibilities are almost endless! Think about your goals, and target accordingly…

Facebook Faux Pas

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Have you made a Facebook Faux Pas? Don’t worry, we’ve all done it!

Here’s my list of top five FFPs (Facebook Faus Pas):

  1. Posting a link, but leaving the link text in the post. Once you paste the link, you can actually delete the link text from the post copy. This makes your post look spiffy and clean!
  2. Making a text-only post. Text-only posts have very little reach compared to those with photos, links and videos. Even if you don’t have a relevant photo handy to add to your post, please try to find a good-quality stock photo to go with the post. You can try using Pixabay for royalty-free images. Also try Unsplash for more dramatic and/or artistic photos (such as the one featured above!).
  3. Posting a link that does not include a photo. Many people don’t realize that if they are posting a link on their business page and it has no photo, you can add one! Just like text-only posts don’t get as much reach, text-only links don’t either. They just look a bit ugly and people are much less likely to click on them. So again, if the orginal article doesn’t have a photo (which is a website faux pas!) then you should add a stock photo.
  4. Your host created an event for you on Facebook, but you duplicated the efforts by creating another event! Each event IRL (in real life) should be represented on Facebook by ONE event, even if there are multiple hosts and/or presenters. This will increase the reach of the event, and make it much easier to give updates to fans who say they are interested in attending. Always share the original event. You can even use the nifty “Add to Page” button to show the event in your events tab, making it appear as if you “own” the event even if you didn’t create it.
  5. Posting too frequently! This is a big one. Please, don’t post more than once every 24 hours. The recommendations for posting frequency for pages that have 1,000-10,000 fans is actually still only 3-5 times per week. If you must, please schedule your posts so that they at least publish on different days. Going on a posting spree (making multiple posts in one day, or even in one hour) will result in decreased or almost zero reach for most of your posts.

These tips are aimed at business pages, but many of them apply to personal profiles as well. Any questions? Give me a buzz: 207.939.6210.

Happy Facebooking!

🙂

Leah

Sponsoring Women’s Safety

Women's Self Defense: SAFE Plan

“The difference between being paranoid and being prepared is the process of being informed.” -John Jenkins

We are sponsoring a Women’s Self Defense class, on June 10th from 9am-12pm. This three hour class, created and taught by John Jenkins, is called SAFE Plan.

The SAFE Plan program is about:

Simplicity: Easy to learn, practice and master.

Avoidance: Learning the skill of risk assessment to help avoid escalating threats.

Focus: Knowing what to look for in finding “a way out” of a threatening situation.

Escaping: Ability to quickly get out of an unsafe situation.

Says John, “Our daughters and all women should be encouraged to explore and reach for their dreams while understanding how to minimize their exposure to risk. SAFE Plan provides simple, safe, and effective methods of preventing, recognizing, de-escalating, and escaping unsafe situations.”

Registrants need only bring writing materials (notebook and pen/pencil), have a willingness to learn, and wear comfortable/loose fitting clothing.

This class is for ages 12 and up, but adolescents should be accompanied by an adult because we will be covering adult topics of assault and domestic violence.

This class is an affordable $25 per person ($20 for adolescents) and tickets can be purchased on Eventbrite, or by contacting Leah Twitchell if you prefer to mail a check, call her cell FMI: 207.939.6210. Because we have limited space in this class, pre-registration is required. Thanks!